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as a result of what's in the bill and what's not. >> brown: then, new killings in pakistan, we look at the uptick in violence against aid workers and women teachers with "washington post" foreign affairs reporter pam constable. >> woodruff: paul solman takes us inside a company that turns a profit by employing an unusual workforce. >> a massachusetts manufacturing firm founded in 1932 where the median age is 74 and rosa finnegan over there, is 100. >> brown: and ray suarez talks with journalist and author claudia kolker about what she calls "the immigrant advantage." >> i began to ask foreign-born people what i call the question: what's the smartest thing that people did in your home country that you want to hang on to while you're here and the rest of us ought to copy? >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from view
": the targeting of pakistan aid workers; the value of seniors in the workforce and the "immigrant advantage." but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street started the year with a bang, as the fiscal cliff deal put an end to fears of sweeping tax hikes and spending cuts. the dow jones industrial average surged 308 points to close at 13,412-- its biggest gain in a year. the nasdaq rose more than 92 points to close at 3,112. the civil war in syria yielded grim new numbers today. the u.n. human rights office reported the number of dead has risen sharply over previous figures. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of "independent television news." some of the images may be disturbing. >> truly shocking. the words of the u.n. officials. syrians need no persuading of that. today, at least another 30 or so added to the death list. somebody fired into the petrol station. they'd have none here for four days. news was spreading fast that respliefs happening and the place was crowded. vulnerable human bodies... metal, concrete, fire, and high explosive.
from across the region, including pakistan. we welcome recent steps that have been taken in at that regard and we'll look for more tangible steps because a stable and secure afghanistan is in the interest not only of the afghan people and the united states, but the entire region. and finally, we reaffirm the strategic partnership we signed last year in kabul, the partnership between two sovereign nations, deepening ties of trade and commerce, development of education, opportunities for all afghans, men and women, boys and girls. this sends a clear message to afghans and to the region, as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow strong. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governments and development that delivers for the afghan people an
personally intervened to resolve a diplomatic crises and difficult places from pakistan and afghanistan to egypt and sudan. and i really look forward to working with you on some of the challenging issues as it faces the country in the world but we start back to something and number of senators have referred to in your opening statement which you said. i just want to say i've been deeply encouraged by your response to senator shaheen's comments and senator rubio. we are sadly foreign commercial service woefully underrepresented and wherever opportunity to advocate for american business and american values and as you know i chaired to the hearings on this. we are about to come out with a report from the subcommittee and i would be interested as the first of my several questions and how you see has successfully competing with china which has a rapidly growing footprint across africa in both economic opportunities and in our differing values agenda and what that makes doing for and how you would address that as secretary e and senator coons were a terrific team with respect to africa and i
, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has a colin -- it is what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our country and our national security. i know he believes in
that when we leave, the taliban and al qaeda will come back. as long as they're given safe haven in pakistan, they're just waiting for us to leave. i do not see any benefit for our country to remain there. host: some of the callers have said we need to keep at least 10,000. some of the stories we have been reading have said anywhere from 3000-6000. you say we should be out of their completely? caller: yes, i think we should just leave. as long as they have one of the most corrupt governments of their -- as long as pakistan allows the taliban and al qaeda safe havens, they are just waiting for us to leave and they will come back in. host: we are going to move on to paul in illinois. paul served as an officer. what kind of work did you do over there? caller: i was army and i work in civil affairs during reconstruction in the 2010 and 2011. host: what kind of response did you get for the reconstructive work you were doing? caller: it was mixed with the afghan people. in areas interested in the work for reconstruction with medical and education. education is the key to success. one said we have
and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sedan. -- sudan. historians will be judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy at much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i want to ask john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to eject. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has -- it is what we do. we fight for people back,. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our c
president. -- presidents. he led the afghanistan-pakistan review. bruce has written two books in his time here. a third is about to come out. the first two were about al qaeda. the search for al qaeda and the deadly embrace. the new book coming out next month is "avoiding armageddon." it is about the us -- pakistan -- u.s.-pakistan relationship. general stanley mcchrystal spent 34 years in the new oteri. he was -- in the military. he was the director of the joint staff. in military circles, this five- year. of -- five-year period of joint special operations command is what makes them memorable and historic. the reality is that he has done more to carry the fight to al qaeda since 2001 than any other person in this department, possibly in the country. after that, bob gates got up, and the secretary of defense called him one of the finest men at arms this country as ever produced, then continued over the past decade, no single american has inflicted more fear and more loss of life on our country most vicious and violent enemies than dan mcchrystal -- stan mcchrystal. that makes him sound pr
three questions. one is afghanistan, the sec is pakistan. with regard to afghanistan, i wanted to ask you about the first question relates to president karzai and the leches ahead of them. when he was here just a couple of weeks ago, i had the chance to visit with him in leader mcconnel's office and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in
dead in pakistan in what appears to be the latest case of militants targeting health- related groups. last month at least nine volunteers with a polio vaccination drive were killed across pakistan. opposition to health efforts has spread after the cia used a fake vaccination program to help fight osama bin laden. five of the workers killed in tuesday's attack or young women who worked as educators. the remaining two were help workers. a new tally shows the number of civilians killed in iraq rose in 2012 for the first time in three years. the british-based group iraq body count says about 4500 civilians were killed in violence last year. the group said in a statement -- iraq body counts figure is more than twice the number given by iraqi officials who claim violence is actually dropping. on monday, at least 23 people were killed, 87 wounded in a series of attacks across iraq. no. 3 leader kim jong un has called for harmony with south korea in a rare televised address. in a speech broadcast on new year's day, he made no mention of the country's controversial nuclear program and said th
, and pakistan. every other country in the world we are under the kind of contracting rules i think interfere with our capacity to get the best deal particularly when it comes to security we should in the countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. should we look to extend that to mali or somalia? >> there was an article i think in one of the newspapers today that went into detail. for more than two decades federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local guard services at the embassies abroad. there is that olding you get what you pay for and this lowest-price provision started off in 1990 but it has stayed with us and i would respectfully request this committee take a hard look at it. you cannot do a total lifting of it for everyone look at the high threat posts where obviously we did it for iraq, afghanistan, and pakistan and the countries you made would fall into that category. >> among the various islamic extremist groups operating in africa today, in your view which poses the greatest threat,
, afghanistan, and pakistan. every other country in the world, we are under the kind of contracting rules that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to mali and the drc and somalia? >> i would recommend -- there was an article in one of the newspapers that went into detail and here's how it started. for more than two decades, they required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractors for the embassies abroad. you get what you pay for. the provision started in 1990 and stayed with us. i would respectfully request that this submitee take a look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody, at least look at the high threat posts where we did it for iraq, afghanistan and pack o pakistan and the countries you are naming are countries that i would fall into that category. >> thank you very much. among the various extremist groups operating in africa today, in your view,
public and successful diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in temperatures terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bauer, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he's been to egypt since then and every time colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator here has a colin bauer. it's what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific brid
against terrorism. tens of thousands of people in pakistan are protesting in the streets, furious at corruption in their own government. and just this morning, pakistan's highest court ordered the prime minister to be placed under arrest. this is a move critics claim is unconstitutional. security forces, meanwhile, are standing on shipping containers to block access to parliament. they're firing guns and tear gas to hold back the crowds. we'll have updates as news warrants. >>> and now, to your money and a price spike at the supermarket. the cold snap bringing record low temps to the southwest is starting to drive up prices in the produce aisle. people across the country are already paying more for lettuce. prices, meanwhile, for broccoli and cauliflower are likely to rise, as well. farmers from california to arizona say the unusually frigid weather has damaged their crops. and it could take ten days to determine the full impact. >>> and a troubling sign for the economy and the financial security for millions of americans. a new report showing that more than one-quarter of america
. iraq, afghanistan and pakistan so every country in the world we are under the kind of contracting world that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to the drc come to somalia? >> there was an article i think in one of the newspapers today that went into some detail. basically years has started. federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local card services at its embassies abroad and there's that old saying you get what you pay for and this lowest price provision started off in 1990, but it has just stayed with us and i would respectfully request that this committee would take a hard look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody at least look at the highest post where obviously we did it for iraq and afghanistan and pakistan and the countries that you are naming our countries that i think would fall into that category.
on that deadly attack on aid workers in pakistan. we'll learn how a failed plan to capture osama bin laden may have led to a violent climate against innocent civilians who were only trying to help others. >>> and a new movie touching nerves and sparking controversy. we'll hear from the stars of "django unchained." a fascinating interview. >> i have not seen it yet. i hear jamie foxx is pretty good. but tarantino does not shy away from controversy. >>> children, teachers and staff take up a familiar scene this morning, they are going to school. >> parents are being reassured that the new setng is the safest school in the entire country. abc's diana perez has more on this. good morning, diana. >> reporter: rob and paula, it's been less than three weeks since the mac kerr at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. it will be a long time before things return to normal for the children of sandy hook elementary. but in an effort to bring them one step closer, they saw their teachers again wednesday and walked through what will be their new school. >> children are coming up, so excited
diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bower, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times, he's been to egypt since then, and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator here has a colin bower. it's what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bent over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administrati
the program perhaps in yemen, pakistan and other hot areas? >> suzanne, as you know, the principle architect, arguably, in yemen. he has traveled to yemen several times since the christmas day attempt in yemen to bring down u.s. flight over detroit. in the foundation that i work, new america foundation, in addition to cnn, we track that and we find that pakistan is going down rather dramatically, compared to 2010. it's expanding rapidly in yemen. one strike two years ago and there were probably -- at least 46 in this past year. so, he has presided over this policy. surely, it will be a topic at his nomination, whether you think of it negatively or positively. >> do you think it will have an impact by people who say this is not the way of doing things, going to war and going after terrorists? >> i doubt it, suzanne. i think there's broad support for this in general in washington and in congress. dealing most directly with the drones is satisfied in her own mind and has said publicly that the drones don't kill a lot of civilians, there's a great deal of caretaken with this. bro broadly speakin
. the terribly difficult challenge dealing with and reducing the flow of calcium ammonium nitrate from pakistan into afghanistan which finds its way into the roadside bombs that kill our troops, known as ied's. thank you for the work. the work on behalf of women throughout the world but also women and girls particularly in afghanistan and even though we are still in the throes of responding to the challenges in syria, the great work you have done on humanitarian assistance and other elements of that strategy we have worked together on. i also want to commend the words he spoke today about not retreating when it comes to getting that balance right queen engagement and also security. both high priorities. i was struck by and i am glad you were so is this a bit on page 3 of your testimony about -- you were so pacific on page 3 of your testimony. the recommendation by the board which now has found its way into the jake now is a set of 64 specific action items. you said 85% are on track to be completed by the end of march. what if any impediments and implementation do you perceive right now and are
down drone attacks on al qaeda affiliates in pakistan, yemen, will not use other counterterrorism resources to identify, locate and detain the terrorists involved in the death of our ambassador and others in libya. this inconsistent policy may stem from the president's hasty campaign promise to shut down guantanamo bay, gitmo, prematurely transfer detention facilities in iraq and afghanistan. in doing so the president effectively ended america's ability to detain and interrogate terrorists, depriving the f.b.i., the c.i.a. and other agencies of critical opportunities to obtain information on al qaeda networks. today, as the case of benghazi suspect harzi, has demonstrated, the united states is completely reliant on the cooperation of host countries to detain on our behalf and selectively allow access to suspects. as in the case of harzi, as demonstrated, this approach is fraught with diplomatic roadblocks, costing critical time and getting information from suspects to track terrorist networks. perhaps that is why president obama so often opts to use lethal drone strikes to kill te
, endangering the government of pakistan and risking the prospect that pakistan is very substantial arsenal of nuclear weapons would fall into radical hands. that's why we're there and if we lose sight of that and i think that's what the administration is doing, we'll find ourselves sooner, rather than later, under real threats once again. bill: that is a significant issue. something we'll watch especially tomorrow. thank you, sir. >> thank you. bill: john bolton in washington. martha of the. martha: this is a huge story right now. we have a deadly flu outbreak that is really causing havoc and so much illness in this country. one city has declared a public health emergency on this. so there's a lot you need to know. that's coming up. bill: also a mother saving her family from an intruder with her own gun. police just releasing the 911 calls of a terrifying home invasion. listen here. >> i heard a lot of screaming. >> right. i'm sure she's upset. >> no. she was shooting. as a mom, you spend a lot of time helping others. hamburger helper can help you back. and with box tops for education on e
mission or return to pakistan? joining us now is the president of act for america, and the author bridgette gabriel. >> good morning, just to recap, let's tell malala's story again. she has been a champion for years of girls education in pakistan. she wants equal rights. she had a blog she spoke out about what was like being a young girl in the swat valley in pakistan, for all of that targeted tore the for the taliban and pulled over her school bus as she was on the way home from school and shot her in the head. miraculously, she survived, thanks to the great work of some pakistan and british doctors. she's now out of the hospital. what's the update on malala and what's next for her? >> she is out of the hospital and her father got a job in britain so her family will remain in britain, where she will be a little bit safer. they will have a little bit of security. but her life, it's going to be an uphill battle trying to protect ser he have from now on because she has become a symbol of freedom to many women in the islamic world and this is why she is he' going to remain a target a
. u.s. drone strikes have killed 15 people in pakistan including a taliban commander, according to officials there. mavi nazir was killed along several other people in the strike in south missouri stand wednesday night. a second strike this morning in north was harassed and killed at least four people. the united nations says more than 60,000 people have died in syria over nearly two years of fighting between the government forces and rebels opposed to president bashar al-assad. a new analysis of the toll conducted for the u.n. human rights office took five months to complete using data from seven sources, including the syrian government. the number is higher than the previous estimate of 45,000 reported by the british best based syrian observatory for human rights. rupert colville, spokesperson for u.n. human rights commissioner navi pillay, discussed the syrian crisis on al jazeera wednesday. >> it became so complicated. there were so many different people reporting casualties, so many different places where violence and fighting was going on simultaneously. and no way really
.95 a day. >>> welcome back, everybody. a serious story from pakistan. on tuesday, seven people were killed in what's considered the largest attack targeting efforts against polio. >> despite the attacks, vaccination workers say they will continue fighting this disease. abc nick schifrin has the details. >> reporter: the woman beneath this shroud is dead simply because she cared for needily children. she and her team were buried after being gunned down in their van by militants. >> it was ambushed. six of the female workers -- >> reporter: this boy lost his mother in the attack, the third in just three weeks against workers taking part in what had been a very successful program to vaccinate against polio. the woman's boss says she blames the gunmen and the cia. the cia tried every idea it could think of to get into the compound. among the neighbors, the cia. they moved into one of these houses. they even hired this doctor to launch a fake vaccine campaign. but that may have backfired in the long-term, because today the taliban cites the program to justify their attacks. >> because of these
was in pakistan a couple weeks ago, and we heard for ourselves there was political impact and drones and the way they were exploited, very visibly in the uprunning up to the election, and you know the next 30 american women to the drone impact sites and used a powerful attack on american engagement. i wanted to know if you could give reaction to the argument that they are worried that the missile technology control regime is damming the market for drones, and they are looking for some kind of relaxation so, i mean, can you tell us what -- i know what the policy is in relation to drone activity and pakistan, but on the wider use of drones and the extent to which you feel that the system we have is adequate to control, particularly those who supply components. >> well, the controls on the empty fee are, the controls of the exports of uavs are strong, and those capable of traveling beyond the range of only 300 kilometers and carrying a payload above 500 kilograms are subject, as i'm sure you know, to a strong presumption of denial where an advocate of strong control and partners feel that we've ens
looks like it's dividing itself, it seems reminiscent of pakistan and how its fledgling democracy works between the civilian and the military relationship. >> well, there are a lot of the chronic problems in egypt. no doubt for six years, egypt's major institution was the military. they were the major power brokers, in fact, all of the previous leaders of this country came from the military. mohamed morsi is the first civilian leader to be elected. a lot of people feel that the military and the muslim brotherhood have cut a deal. a lot of people feel the military still pulse a lot of strings behind the scenes of what is happening here. you have a lot of institutional problems in the state as the country tries to grapple with new realities of trying to build democratic institutions that for so many years have been anything but c democratic. >> how can morsi end this crisis? >>. >> well, right now, he feels he has a democratic mandate. he has a large popular base of support. he won the elections. his constitution was passed in a nationwide referendum. his party won a majority in the parli
is captain katie petronia we intervurd her. she served in front line positions in afghanistan and pakistan, and wrote get over it. we're not all created equal. >> i found i broke down and muscle atrophy at a much faster rate and noticeable rate than my male marines. i found myself tripping constantly. my legs buckling, falling during firefights. >> reporter: this is going to be a debate here in the military among the elite units as to whether, whether women will be able to be as physically strong for some of those special operations teams in particular and some of those elite marine units. but secretary panetta and chairman of the joint chiefsmpse announcement later today and the joint chiefs are behind secretary panetta on this. bill: thank you, jennifer griffin, early with us today at the pentagon. martha? martha: pentagon spokesperson releasing this statement on the issue saying, quote, secretary panetta strongly supports these changes. he recognizes over the last decade women have contributed in unprecedented ways to the military's mission. they put their lives on the line to defend th
in pakistan after coordinated bomb attack that killed 96 people yesterday. religious leaders refusing to bury their dead until the government promises to protect them from further violence. >> jamie: there is a new push to hold syrian leaders responsible for the violence in the country's civil war going on there. 50 countries backing a proposal to the united nations to clear the way for referring members of the assad regime to the war crimes tribunal in the hague. >> gregg: a new concern as the flu outbreak spreads all over the country. there are reports of a shortage of the medication tamiflu. we'll have more on this in just a moment. >> jamie: also this is an interesting story. it's billed as a future of commercial air travel. federal regulators have already raised pretty serious concerns about boeing's 787 dreamliner. she's sweet burks there is problems. they're calling for a comprehensive review of the design, the manufacturing and the assembly process of the plane after a string of frightening incidents. dominic with the latest from our los angeles bureau. tell us what is the latest? >>
envoy to afghanistan, sudan and pakistan at crucial moments. senator kerry advocated for democratic elections in the philippines. he was part of the delegation that uncovered the fraud that ultimately led to the removal of president ferdinand marcos. he was a strong proponent of u.s. action to end ethnic cleansing in kosovo and to impose sanctions on burma tied to human rights abuses. senator kerry has been a leader in promoting economic development and recovery in haiti, fighting global hiv-aids, supporting democracy and human dignity, and the advancement of human empowerment throughout the world. in his early days in the senate, senator kerry and i -- in fact, we were elected together in 1984, we came to the senate together, but right after that, shortly after that, senator kerry and i went on a fact-finding mission to nicaragua and unearthed information regarding the activities of the contra guerrillas which he presented to the committee on foreign relations. based in part on his ground-breaking findings, the committee launched an investigation into the funding of the contra guer
in pakistan killed five suspected militants overnight. happened in the northwest tribal area which is a main hide out. the missile attack is the 7th one in the last couple weeks. >> officials seem to have come up with an alternative plan to president chavez's inauguration ceremony. the reelected president is currently in cuba recovering from cancer surgery. the vice president has invited leaders throughout latin america as they normally would for the inauguration. they will show support for the ailing leader with a rally outside of the presidential palace. despite being in critical condition, remains in pull power of that country. >> locally, though, hoping we're going to see sunshine. >> should see plenty of sunshine. should be a nice day. >> excellent. >> can't wait. into the weekend here , springtime temperatures. might want to go and tell your flowers not yet. >> put a blanket over them. >> make sure they are not ready to do their thing yet. >> derek is coming in today. if there's anything you can do. >> i can tell you the weather is going to be very conducive making it feel like spring
is in pakistan. >> well the white house has been concerned about some of those safe havens and al qaeda working with the taliban which is still supporting al qaeda. >> well, i mean if you look way back to when this war started, that's where it all began, right? you had a taliban government in kabul and they let al qaeda in. that's basically the concern, what happens if the taliban comes back. >> dexter, if we've effectively beaten al qaeda in afghanistan, why do we have to be there? >> well that's a good question. i think, again, if you look back to 2001 when we went to war after 9/11 we were going after al qaeda and we went after the government that was giving them sanctuary, which was the taliban. we took that government and we tried for the last 12 years to put something in its place. we tried to build a government and build a state that would stand on its own. it's a very hard country. we haven't really done a very good job of doing that. and so the question that everybody should be asking themselves is, you know can this thing, which we've built, stand on
a diplomat since 1975 and served previously in pakistan, tunesia, saudi arabia, oman and israel. the bounty is on the table for six months and a middle east research institute has been tracking several twitter accounts being used by al qaeda in the arabian peninsula to spread the word about this offer to assassinate firestein. on twitter these terrorists have been using a hash tag that translates to al qaeda's reward. in addition to this $160,000 bounty for the ambassador, there is a separate $23,000 bounty being offered to anyone who kills an american soldier in yemen. the middle east media research institute points out that social media is becoming more and more popular with these terrorists because the forums they had been using on-line are being shut down and this news about a bounty on the head of a u.s. ambassador in yemen comes a little less than four months after the u.s. ambassador to libya, chris stevens, was murdered along with three other americans during a deadly raid on the u.s. consolate in benghazi, libya. a state department spokesman would not comment to bloomberg news abou
sandy. what it does is cut into foreign aid with the exception of israel, afghanistan or pakistan and shift those moneys being spent on foreign aid to instead be spent on american aid to the victims of hurricane sandy so it is paid for, it is a substantive pay for the amounts are unknown because it is the key to how much money is spent or has already been spent on foreign aid, and that can fluctuate depending on when this legislation should pass. the reason i am submitting the pay for is because the precarious condition the united states government sees itself to the financially we're on a path to nowhere. financially, we are looking at instead of a fiscal clough, a fourth consecutive deficit we have $16 trillion in total debt to increase that beyond $16 trillion to put that into perspective the amount of damages done to the country on an annual basis now serving the data is excess of $20 billion to put it in perspective that $220 billion that we're spending for servicing the past is three times all of those sought by entertains and the victims. best case scenario give them everyt
by hurricane sandy but to it cuts into foreign aid with the exception of israel afghanistan or pakistan to shift those moneys to instead be spent on american aid it is a substantive because the amount is of unknown for what has been spent on foreign-aid the reason i submit the pay for is of the precarious position the government sees itself. we're on a path to know where financially. then said of the fiscal cliff we have a debt mountain, a $16 trillion of total debt and ane
: they are refusing to bury the dead after a brutal terror attack in pakistan. southwestern part of the country. the town of quetta. the victims families demanding the government do something to protect them after twin bombings outside of a pool hall that killed 86 people, mostly shiite. that was one of several attacks across the country on thursday that left 120 dead. making it the nation's deadliest day of violence it has seen in five-year's time. martha: well the nra is now saying that the white house was just quote, checking a box, when they sat down yesterday with vice president joe biden to talk about gun violence which has been the real course of all these meetings over the course of this week. the group says they believe that the obama administration is less interested in protecting children and more interested in attacking the second amendment. so the nra says that the white house is set on blaming the actual weapon rather than getting tougher on the person using it. here's some of that. >> we feel very strongly that gun crime needs to be prosecuted vigorously and that is not happening
about the a rather good aid, but on pakistan, republicans and democrats a we need to payback that aid. rand paul has really been pushing that. others like senator john mccain say we cannot just cut them off. foreign aid is very important if you want to get them to do what we want them to do and foster democracy. guest: before we let you go, bob cusack, we'll take another phone call. tell us about the freshman class and who are some names, faces people should be looking out for, people might make a name for themselves. guest: senator tim kaine is a democrat from virginia. he defeated george allen in the election. he is a former governor. this is very close to president obama. he was almost vice-president. talk about your money in the senate. elizabeth warren won a huge battle with senator scott brown. how will she going to operate? the financial industry is a little bit nervous about her. she had the idea to come up with the consumer bureau that was so controversial, the agency that is now up and running as far as wall street reform. those two have strong personalities. they could also
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